Mandalay, Burma. 1994. - Steve McCurry Print – Magnum Photos

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Mandalay, Burma. 1994.

"Earthquakes caused these deep cracks to appear in the incredible Mingun Pagoda. Built to house a relic of the Buddha, the brick structure was originally intended to be over 150 meters tall. However, the technology was not capable of enabling its full construction and so it reaches 30 meters. Framed by the massive entrance, three monks are seen climbing the crumbling steps. Split by an earthquake in 1838, King Bodawpaya's pagoda in Mingun, near Mandalay, is a monument to earthly ambition and a dream unfulfilled. Begun in 1790 to enshrine a holy relic -a tooth reputed to be the Buddha's- the pagoda was envisioned by Bodawpaya as the world's largest. In brutally familiar Burmese tradition, thousands of slaves did the work. When Bodawpaya died in 1819, the brick base with its decorated doorway stood 162 feet high -about one-third the planned height- and 236 feet long on each side. Bodawpaya's children decided that that was big enough. They halted construction on the ornate structure that was to sit atop the brick base, and the shrine fell into disuse. Despite the pagoda's ruined condition, visitors must still remove their shoes before entering the sacred site." Swerdlow, Joel L. (July 1995). Burma: The Richest of Poor Countries. National Geographic. Vol. 188, No. 1, 94-95.

We are here to help. Please let us know if you have any questions about this or any other Magnum prints. You can contact one of the following print sales associates.

LONDON & NEW YORK
Chelsea Jacob
chelsea.jacob@magnumphotos.com
T: +44 20 7490 1771

PARIS
Christina Vatsella
christina.vatsella@magnumphotos.com
T: +33 1 53 42 50 44

Shipping advisory

We advise on a delivery period of up to 3 weeks for your print. If you would like your print sooner, please contact your local print sales representative for stock information. Collectors prints will be listed at retail value for shipping purposes and customs duties on import are at your cost and not included in your Magnum purchase.

"What is important to my work is the individual picture. I photograph stories on assignment, and of course they have to be put together coherently. But what matters most is that each picture stands on its own, with its own place and feeling." - Steve McCurry


Mandalay, Burma. 1994.

"Earthquakes caused these deep cracks to appear in the incredible Mingun Pagoda. Built to house a relic of the Buddha, the brick structure was originally intended to be over 150 meters tall. However, the technology was not capable of enabling its full construction and so it reaches 30 meters. Framed by the massive entrance, three monks are seen climbing the crumbling steps. Split by an earthquake in 1838, King Bodawpaya's pagoda in Mingun, near Mandalay, is a monument to earthly ambition and a dream unfulfilled. Begun in 1790 to enshrine a holy relic -a tooth reputed to be the Buddha's- the pagoda was envisioned by Bodawpaya as the world's largest. In brutally familiar Burmese tradition, thousands of slaves did the work. When Bodawpaya died in 1819, the brick base with its decorated doorway stood 162 feet high -about one-third the planned height- and 236 feet long on each side. Bodawpaya's children decided that that was big enough. They halted construction on the ornate structure that was to sit atop the brick base, and the shrine fell into disuse. Despite the pagoda's ruined condition, visitors must still remove their shoes before entering the sacred site." Swerdlow, Joel L. (July 1995). Burma: The Richest of Poor Countries. National Geographic. Vol. 188, No. 1, 94-95.

We are here to help. Please let us know if you have any questions about this or any other Magnum prints. You can contact one of the following print sales associates.

LONDON & NEW YORK
Chelsea Jacob
chelsea.jacob@magnumphotos.com
T: +44 20 7490 1771

PARIS
Christina Vatsella
christina.vatsella@magnumphotos.com
T: +33 1 53 42 50 44

Shipping advisory

We advise on a delivery period of up to 3 weeks for your print. If you would like your print sooner, please contact your local print sales representative for stock information. Collectors prints will be listed at retail value for shipping purposes and customs duties on import are at your cost and not included in your Magnum purchase.